Lassen.

“When we lose these woods, we lose our soul. Not simply as individuals, but as a people.” – Kevin Walker

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Lassen National Forest

http://www.ecoangler.com/habitat/Mill_Creek_California.html

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The Lassen National Forest lies at the heart of one of the most fascinating areas of California, called the Crossroads. Here the granite of the Sierra Nevada, the lava of the Cascades and the Modoc Plateau, and the sagebrush of the Great Basin meet and blend.

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Diamond Mountains area of Lassen National Forest

http://old.geog.psu.edu/vegdyn/AspenLassen.php

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Lassen National Forest is a national forest of 1,700 square miles in northeastern California. It is named after pioneer Peter Lassen, who mined, ranched and promoted the area to emigrant parties in the 1850s.

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Lassen NF

http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/lassen/about-forest

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In the southern Cascade foothills, approximately twenty miles east of Red Bluff, California, lies the Ishi Wilderness, a unique 41,000 acre, low-elevation wilderness. This is a land incised by wind and water, dotted with basaltic outcroppings, caves, and bizarre pillar lava formations. This is up and down country, a series of east-west running ridges framed by rugged river canyons.

The Ishi is named for a Yahi Yana Indian who was the last survivor of his tribe, who lived in the area for over three thousand years. Shortly after 1850, the white settlers killed all but a handful of the Yahi. Ishi (the Yahi word for man) and a few others escaped and lived quietly for decades in this harsh, wild country.

The Tehama deer herd, the largest migratory herd in California, winters in the area. Other wildlife include wild hog, mountain lion, black bear, coyote, bobcat and rabbit.

Rock cliffs provide nesting sites for a variety of raptors including hawks, eagles, falcons, and owls. Other common sightings include wild turkey, quail, mourning doves, canyon wrens, band-tailed pigeons, and myriad songbirds.

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Lassen National Forest, October

http://www.mikefergusonrecreation.com/custompage.asp?pg=trips

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The Caribou Wilderness is a gentle, rolling, forested plateau dotted with glacial lakes. Reminders of volcanic and glacial origin are apparent throughout this remote, unpopulated area. Crater peaks, cinder cones, and numerous large and small depressions have resulted in the formation of the crystalline lakes that are scattered throughout the plateau.

Caribou Peaks, Black Cinder Rock, and Red Cinder are points of interest. The average elevation is 6,900 feet. The highest point, Red Cinder, is 8,370 feet. From here there are majestic views of the lofty mountains that surround this primitive wilderness. Located on the eastern slopes of what was once Mount Tehama, this area is surrounded by the volcanic peaks of Swain Mountain, Bogard Buttes, Prospect Peak, Ash Butte, Red Cinder Cone and Mount Harkness.

The Forest cover is mostly lodgepole pine with a mixture of jeffrey pine, white and red fir, western white pine, and hemlock. In early summer, wildflowers brighten the trail and water lilies cluster in ponds.

The headwaters of the Susan River originate in the Caribou. This water percolates up through the porous volcanic aquifer and is a major year around water source for the east slope of the Cascades. While scouting out a route to bring wagon trains through, early day hunting parties also ventured into the Caribou area to find game for survival. Today, their route is known as the Lassen Trail.

The larger lakes that are deep enough to support fish are home to brook and rainbow trout. Some familiar birds that make their home in the Caribou are the bald eagle, osprey, common merganser, eared grebe, and many types of ducks.

The summer use period is approximately June 15 to October 15, although early spring could open up the lower areas by Memorial Day. Hypothermia can be a problem in spring and fall seasons with cold rains.

http://www.fs.usda.gov/attmain/lassen/specialplaces

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Lassen National Forest

http://mayaspctjournal.blogspot.com/2012/07/day-73-lassen-national-forest.html

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Located within the southern portion of the Cascade Mountain Range is 16,335 acres of contrasting topography.   Thousand Lakes Wilderness is midway between the town of Burney and Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Volcanic and glacial formations, rocky ravines, mountain slopes, open meadows, and stands of lodgepole pine and red fir define the Wilderness. It is dominated by 8,677 foot Crater Peak, the highest point on the Lassen National Forest, and is a reminder of the glacial action that eroded Thousand Lakes Volcano and created the many small lakes and ponds scattered throughout. The lowest point in the Wilderness occurs at the base of the volcano at 5,546 feet.

The seven major lakes that lie within the Wilderness valley contain trout. Several species of wildlife make their home in the Wilderness. With a little luck and a good pair of binoculars you might spot some the more permanent residents; black-tailed deer, black bear, pika, pine marten, northern goshawk, spotted owl, pileated woodpecker, and Clark’s nutcracker. Even elk have been known to visit occasionally.

Another critter worth mentioning is the mosquito. At times they are thick and hungry. It would be advisable to carry insect repellent in your pack.

http://www.fs.usda.gov/attmain/lassen/specialplaces

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Horses near Lassen National Forest

http://www.stbernardlodge.com/travel-with-horse.php

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Spend the night at McCarthy Point Lookpout, which was constructed in 1936 by the Conservation Corps. It was used as an observation point for detecting fires from 1937 to the mid 1960s. McCarthy Point is approximately 3,600 feet above sea level and is located in a very remote area of the Lassen National Forest.

http://www.nationalforests.org/explore/forests/ca/lassen

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Lassen NF stream

http://needpictures.com/blog/vacation/day-04-lassen-national-park/

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“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people to whom it is easy to do good, and who are not accustomed to have it done to them; then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one’s neighbor — such is my idea of happiness.” – Leo Tolstoy

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