Saturday November 24, 2012

* * *

Back in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, my grandmother used to take me Christmas shopping.  Sometimes it was downtown Chester and a couple of times in Philadelphia.  We would go with her church group on a bus on some of the trips. Other times, my grandfather drove and dropped us off in their Studebaker.

One time we ate at an automated cafeteria where we put in coins, opened a small door and pulled out a sandwich.  We could see the various food items through glass in each door. I could see people in uniforms behind the wall putting in fruit, pieces of pie and sandwiches.

One time, mam-mam took me with her on a shopping trip to Chester and we ate at a tiny restaurant called the Yellow Bowl. It had white cotton tablecloths and napkins and I ordered Welsh Rarebit.  It looked like melted fondue cheese on toast and I just loved it.  It was the only place that had it on the menu – because I always asked when we ate at a restaurant.

* * *

* * *

There was a small department store called Weinberg’s and another much larger one called Stotter’s that had very old hardwood floors that creaked quite a bit.  Stotter’s was where we went to see Santa Claus and had our photographs taken with him.

* * *

* * *

Because I had a Christmas club at the bank, I had a small amount of money to buy my parents, siblings and grandparents gifts.

* * *

* * *

When I got a little older, pap-pap used to take me to a nearby Grant’s department store to help him buy xmas presents on Christmas Eve Day. He bought me a Skipper doll one year and a 1964 IDEAL Gaylord Basset Hound dog toy for a younger brother.  The adults all found the toy hilarious.

* * *

* * *

Not being a fan of crowds in anyway, shape or form, I’ve never set the alarm clock on the Friday after Thanksgiving and gone shopping.  I would prefer to have root canal surgery without any Novacaine than being in a crowd especially on that day.  And with catalogs and Internet, why anyone would do that is beyond my comprehension.

Perhaps it’s because I’ve been in a divestment process the past three years. There’s nothing like going through boxes and boxes of possessions, photographing and selling – or donating to charity – to remind me of how I was once focused on acquisitions.  It seems the whole Thanksgiving weekend hoopla promotes this acquiring rather than on true gift-giving.  When I see the crowds of people pushing and shoving one another on the TV news,  I’m grateful I have no need to participate.

* * *

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s