Monthly Archives: January 2013

Math.

This was really interesting:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/max-little/parkinsons-diagnosis-test_b_2545128.html

Back in 1991, one of my clients was Johns Hopkins Hospital in
Maryland that had a similar project that used compressed video. There
was a group of patients who all lived a considerable driving distance
from Johns Hopkins and whose medical appointments often overlapped
among various specialists on the diagnostic team. Neurologists,
internists and other specialists were not all available to see each
patient when they came in for an appointment.

Thus the need for creating videos of the patient so each member of the
diagnostic team could see and evaluate the patient as well as compare
changes over time. Johns Hopkins wanted to create a briefcase to give
to a parkinson’s patients’ family. The briefcase had a camera and DDR
so the family members could record their loved one throughout their
daily round. Drinking morning coffee, buttoning a sweater, walking
into another room, etc.

These videos were incorporated into a patient database and made
available to the treatment team’s medical specialists who then
collaborated more efficiently on assessing and helping each patient.

It’s been a long time since I thought about this application of video
compression being used in medical imaging and this article reminded me
today.

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Success.

“A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do.” – Bob Dylan

 

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Both “The Mary Tyler Moore” and “That Girl” television shows were favorites and I dreamed of living alone in the big city like they did.

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Disco Doobies.

No, not that kind of doobie…..although it might be nice to live in states where it’s okay to do so….if only to live around more laid-back type people than here on the East coast.  Oh well, moving west this year so the end is in sight.

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I once had this record, a long-play record and it was such a great song to dance to.

I just saw Kenny Loggins perform with I guess is his band, Blue Sky
Riders on Jay Leno tonight. Earlier, Dustin Hoffman was on and I was
really surprised that he said he was 75. Geez.

And when did Kenny cut his always-long hippie type hair? It was short tonight.

Anyway, I looked up the band:
http://www.rockcellarmagazine.com/2013/01/24/kenny-loggins-blue-sky-riders-debut-album-finally-home-out-129/

Join Kenny Loggins, Three Dog Night, Don Felder and more … for an
amazing, seven-day Caribbean cruise, November 9-16, 2013!

http://www.kennyloggins.com/

However, if Kenny and Three Dog Night are doing cruises, maybe that
says something about us Boomers, eh?

I’ll take Kenny’s oldies:

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Not so average.

 
“I am not more gifted than the average human being. If you know anything about history, you would know that is so–what hard times I had in studying and the fact that I do not have a memory like some other people do… I am just more curious than the average person and I will not give up on a problem until I have found the proper solution. This is one of my greatest satisfactions in life–solving problems–and the harder they are, the more satisfaction do I get out of them. Maybe you could consider me a bit more patient in continuing with my problem than is the average human being. Now, if you understand what I have just told you, you see that it is not a matter of being more gifted but a matter of being more curious and maybe more patient until you solve a problem.” – Albert Einstein

 

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Average White Band, “Nothing You Can Do”

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This band’s albums from the 1970’s are really great. AWB came out with this one when I was in college in Pittsburgh, PA.  Absolutely wonderful dance music that still inspires me to dance. I don’t think anyone gets too old to dance. It keeps people young. And, they just don’t make music like they did in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

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Flame.

“We each have a special something we can get only at a special time of our life, like a small flame. A careful, fortunate few cherish that flame, nurture it, hold it as a torch to light their way. But once that flame goes out, it’s gone forever.” – Haruki Murakami

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… birch & pine campfire I built on the shore of Lake Superior in Lutsen, MN. If you listen closely, you can even hear the waves lapping on the rocky beach…

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“A book, too, can be a star, a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe.” – Madeleine L’Engle

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7 years.

Wyatt Earp the Boxer

Wyatt Earp the Boxer

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2005 will be a year remembered for caring for Doc Holiday, my boxer of 6 and a half years who in January that year, was diagnosed with Lymphoma. There were countless long drives that year to take Doc to his oncologist for chemotherapy. Doc did improve and go into remission for a couple of months and then right after Thanksgiving, got sick again and passed away on December 3rd. I was devastated.

One night before the holidays that year, Doc’s oncologist called me to ask where to mail me his fleece coat. She had laundered it and wanted to send it back. After giving her the address, she then asked if I had met with any boxer breeders yet. I told her “no”. Then she asked me about doing online research for my graduate degree and I told her that yes, I had done considerable research. Then she suggested I do similar research on Boxer breeders. And so I did that over the sad 2005 holidays and found a sweet little Boxer puppy who was in Lawton, Michigan.

Seven years ago today, I drove to Philadelphia International Airport’s area for picking up freight to pick up my Boxer puppy flying in from Michigan.

A small blue crate was there for me but the tiny puppy just did not want to move from the back of the crate. I tried reaching for him but finally the airline employee at the counter held the back of the crate up while the puppy slid forward towards me.

My eyes welled up when I saw the puppy’s face and I held him closely on my chest. He was so very small and seemed incredibly frightened. After connecting flights to get to Philly, I could imagine the strange smells and sounds he must have experienced.

I left the airport carrying the puppy in one arm while carrying the blue crate in the other. Driving back to my elderly parents’ home, I held the puppy close against my chest while driving with the other hand.

As usual, my parents and especially mom thought I was crazy to get another dog but I let their comments go in ear and out the other.

Wyatt is the fourth Boxer that shares my life since the first one I had when living near San Francisco in 1985. The longest I have ever had one has been right at seven years. So there is some fear I have about loss. But I choose to focus on each moment and each day and work hard to stay in the present.

It’s been a quiet day. I heated some sliced roast turkey pieces with nonfat, low salt broth as the “gravy” Wyatt likes on his special kibble. He is what my grandfather used to call the Boxers I grew up with – a “gentleman dog” who naps on the sofa and sleeps on the bed. At 85 pounds, he is surely no pocketbook dog like I see so many young women walking around with.

But I do understand the intense love a person feels for an animal as well as how it feels to be loved so unconditionally. Wyatt Earp loves his mama and I’m very grateful for that and for him. One day at a time.

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Common ground.

Leukerbad and Loetschental Alps

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“In the Years of the Mountains: Exploring the World’s High Ranges in Search of Their Culture, Geology, and Ecology” by David Scott Gilligan

Publication Date: June 1, 2006
For the past ten years David Gilligan has climbed all of the major mountain ranges in the world. His resulting narrative, In the Years of the Mountains, takes readers to the highest places on four continents for an up-close consideration of the cultural, geological, and biological make up of mountains. From the Swiss Alps to the Himalayas, on to New Zealand, and then back to the North American cordillera, Gilligan treats readers to adventure mixed with science and history.
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Wetterhorn

Wetterhorn

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