Journey west.

“The final value of any expedition is not what you have failed to discover but what you have found in its place; the important thing is not so much the dream you pursued but he fact that you pursued it.  Looking back on your journey, what you remember most is not what you were searching for but the search itself.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

Bitterroot-Forest

Bitterroot Forest

http://newstalkkgvo.com/prescribed-burning-to-start-in-bitterroot-forest/

* * *

“There is nowhere to go except back……The idea that merely reaching this spot would be the crowning accomplishment is now exposed as a delusion.  This is not the final point of the journey, it is the halfway point.  And it is halfway with a difference.  There’s less anticipation in going back to what you already left behind.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

Bitterroot

Bitterroot

http://www.pashnit.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7137&garpg=31

* * *

“And so it has been for a nation that followed in their (Lewis and Clark) footsteps west.  It has been the pursuit of the goal, the getting there, the quest for the unreachable, the proving of the unproven that stirs us. “Biggests” and “firsts” and “newests” have been our fascination.  Always in a hurry, often without a map, we have pushed on.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

Bitterroot NF

Bitterroot NF

http://www.selwaybitterroot.org/album/scenic-frank-church-river-of-no-return-wilderness/

* * *

The Corps of Discovery was the first American journey across the continent, and he vast area they crossed, at the time just an embryo of a nation, was to become the ground where everything that defines America would grow: The equation of progress with literal mobility; the preference for simpler values of the small town over the tangled complexities of the big cities; a brashly commercial and pragmatic character that simultaneously sees itself in romantic and idealistic terms; an uneasy suspicion of the structures of society; the idea of footloose freedom associated with cowboys and mountain men; the promise of having your own piece of land a fresh start simply by packing up and moving to the frontier farther west; the presence of wide-open spaces that breeds a feeling of almost naive optimism as expansive as the horizon; and the concept from Manifest Destiny, that if it can done, Americans should, and will do it.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

Bitterroot 2

http://www.burkemuseum.org/herbarium/research_foray_2005

* * *

“We have pushed forward relentlessly, with great things to accomplish and in a rush to get there and do them.  Our national Road Rule has been to proceed on, to keep moving and never stop unless there is no alternative.  For a while, whenever things bogged down and seemed too complicated or strained, we could pick up and go out West to a new territory and leave our troubles behind.  Then we hit the coast; the frontier closed.  We had to turn back, and turning back is a new a different national experience.  Success and progress have been defined by moving on; turning back was failure.  Myths die hard.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

towards Black Pyramid Mountain

towards Black Pyramid Mountain

http://peppermintmine.blogspot.com/

* * *

“Lewis and and Clark went out West to find the Northwest Passage and returned instead with information about geography, plants, animals and people. Those who followed went seeking other things – furs, minerals, homesteads, fame and fortune, to name a few. Most didn’t find what they thought they wanted, but many didn’t regret that they went.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

Clearwater NF

Clearwater NF

http://www.discovernw.org/store_clearwater_2CLWA/

* * *

“Road Rule 26:  The final value of any expedition is not what you failed to discover but what you found in its place; the important thing is not so much the dream you pursued but the fact that you pursued it.  Looking back on your journey, what you remember most is not what you were searching for, but the search itself.” – Dayton Duncan

* * *

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Filed under Healing, Nature, Travel

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