Tag Archives: northern california

remember.

“This is sure stirring up some ghosts for me…”

* * *

Robbie Robertson, “Somewhere Down the Crazy River”, 1987.

* * *

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under California, Music

Mix tape.

“Where words leave off, music begins.” – Heinrich Heine

* * *

Genesis, “Throwing It All away”, 1987 Invisible Touch album

* * *

“I love the relationship that anyone has with music … because there’s something in us that is beyond the reach of words, something that eludes and defies our best attempts to spit it out. … It’s the best part of us probably …” – Nick Hornby

* * *

“Hypnotized” by Fleetwood Mac  from 1973 album “Mystery to Me”

* * *

“Music… will help dissolve your perplexities and purify your character and sensibilities, and in time of care and sorrow, will keep a fountain of joy alive in you.” – Dietrich Bonhoeffer

* * *

Seals and Crofts, “King of Nothing”, 1974, from Unborn Child album

* * *

“Music produces a kind of pleasure which human nature cannot do without.” – Confucious

* * *

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Xmas wish.

* * *

Little did I know when I saw this film back in the late 1970’s at a Philadelphia area theater, that I would be living in the Bay area and even driving south on PCH (Pacific Coast Highway) in 1980 and many times after that.  Oh, what I wouldn’t give to move back to northern California now, especially in the Sierras….

*

Leave a comment

Filed under California

Shasta.

Shasta looms majestically in the pure ether,
capped with a cloud,
against whose bosses the early sungold is beating…

– John Muir, 1877

* * *

Lake Shasta, Mount Shasta, and The Trinity Alps

* * *

Shasta Lake, also called Lake Shasta, is an artificial lake created by the construction of Shasta Dam across the Sacramento River in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest of Shasta County, California.

* * *

Lake Shasta Boat Ramp

* * *

Shasta Lake is a two-story impoundment and provides habitat for both warmwater and coldwater fishes. Habitat for coldwater fish species within the lake is considered good; however, habitat for warmwater fish species is limited by the lack of cover, steep-sided banks, and water level fluctuations.

Fish species within the lake are varied and abundant. Species known to inhabit the lake include: rainbow trout, brown trout, chinook salmon, largemouth bass, spotted bass, smallmouth bass, black crappie, bluegill, carp, Sacramento sucker, Sacramento squawfish, riffle sculpin, black fish, hardhead minnow, white sturgeon, channel squawfish, threadfin shad, white catfish, brown bullhead, golden shiner and green sunfish.

* * *

Houseboat on Lake Shasta

* * *

The basses and trout are the species most frequently caught by anglers. Even though there is some natural reproduction, the coldwater fish populations within the lake are largely maintained through Annual stocking by the California Department of Fish and Game. The warmwater fish populations are self-perpetuating.

http://www.shastalake.com/fishing/

Fishing Regulations:  http://www.anglernet.com/web/lakes/shasta/shstfish.htm

* * *

Lake Shasta morning

* * *

Lake Shasta consists of four major arms: the Sacramento River, Pit River, Squaw Creek and McCloud River. The lake has 370 miles of shoreline and spans more than 30,000 acres. Anglers can fish its maximum depths that reach up to 500 feet.

* * *

Grace Lake Shasta County

* * *

Mount Shasta is one of the twenty or so large volcanic peaks that dominate the High Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest. These isolated peaks and the hundreds of smaller vents that are scattered between them lie about 200 kilometers east of the coast and trend southward from Mount Garibaldi in British Columbia to Mount Lassen in northern California

Mount Shasta stands near the southern end of the Cascades, about 65 kilometers south of the Oregon border. It is a prominent landmark not only because its summit stands at an elevation of 4,317 meters (14,162 feet), but also because its volume of nearly 500 cubic kilometers makes it the largest of the Cascade stratovolcanoes.

Mount Shasta is a compound stratovolcano that has been built by repeated eruptions during the past 200,000 years. Although the mountain itself is relatively young, it has been built atop older basalts and andesites whose ages indicate that volcanism has been taking place at the site of the present cone for at least the past 600,000 years.

* * *

Mt. Shasta from Castle Lake

* * *

Mount Shasta and its immediate surroundings are the products of several geological processes operating in concert. Volcanism has played a major role in shaping this landscape, and the variety of volcanic features found in the southern Cascades reflects the diversity of lavas and eruptive styles common to this region. Episodes of volcanism have alternated with intervals of erosion during which glaciers, streams, and mass movements such as rockfalls, debris flows, and debris avalanches have modified the original volcanic landforms.

Mount Shasta’s most recent eruption occurred about 200 years ago  and low-levels of geothermal and seismic activity still occur on and around the mountain today.

http://www.siskiyous.edu/shasta/geo/pro.htm

* * *

Mount Shasta from Interstate 5

* * *

The High Cascades is the younger of two volcanic mountain ranges that have risen parallel to the Pacific Northwest coast during the past 35 to 40 million years. The lofty stratovolcanoes that dominate the range are less than 2 million years old, but they stand atop a massive platform of basalts that has been built by eruptions from scores of vents during the past 12 million years. This entire suite of High Cascade rocks, in turn, overlies the eroded remnants of an older volcanic chain called the Western Cascades that was active between about 35 and 17 million years ago (McBirney and White, 1982). In order to understand why lavas have risen to build these volcanic mountains over tens of millions of years we need to review a bit about the concepts of plate tectonics and, in particular, the process of subduction.

http://www.siskiyous.edu/shasta/geo/set.htm

* * *

Mt. Shasta and Lenticular clouds

* * *

You will often hear the expression, “Mount Shasta makes its own weather.” How can a mountain make its own weather? The main answer is that Mount Shasta’s presence causes air to be uplifted.

All precipitation comes from clouds. Clouds are formed through the process known as condensation, which is typically caused by cooling. Cooling, in turn, is often caused by the uplifting of air. There are four major processes by which air is uplifted: convective lifting, frontal lifting, convergent lifting, and orographic lifting. Convective summertime thunderstorms produce massive thunderheads on Mount Eddy and Mount Shasta. Wintertime extratropical cyclones produce most of the precipitation formed by frontal lifting in our region. It is the process of orographic lifting that results in Mount Shasta “producing its own weather.”

The term orographic comes from the Greek word oros, meaning mountain. Orographic lifting is caused when moving air (wind) encounters a mountain and is forced upwards in the process. The layer of air replaced at the surface causes the air above it to be lifted and cooled. If there is enough moisture in the air, the cooling will cause it to condense and form clouds. If further condensation occurs then orographic precipitation can be produced.

Mount Shasta is known for its beautiful clouds. The lenticular clouds, often called “flying saucers,” are probably the most well-known type of cloud in the region. However, there are many types of clouds that can be seen around Mount Shasta.

http://www.siskiyous.edu/shasta/env/clouds/

* * *

 

 

 

2 Comments

Filed under California, Nature

Safe.

log cabin in redwoods

* * *

Anticipation can be wonderful or torture depending on a number of factors. Age is one. Remember how Christmas seemed it would never arrive? I remember impending snow storms and how excited we kids were about school closings and instead spending the day outside building snow forts.

Seriousness of a life event such as a wedding, moving and divorce influence how anticipation affects people.  As do the threat of natural disasters. With a hurricane on its way, I’ve felt increasingly anxious. Being alone with my pet dog and keeping us both safe. What constructive actions can I take beyond the stocking up on supplies (and keeping the television off with cable news and weather channel’s increasingly urgent “we’re doomed” hype…)

Back in the late 1980’s, I lived by myself (with two dogs) in a cabin in the redwoods south of San Francisco, California. The first couple of months were really scary; the sounds that suburbia and the forest makes are worlds apart.  Slowly I learned about self reliance in ways that were different from frequent business travel alone in unfamiliar places.

For one, it was quiet. It took some getting used to not hearing traffic and other sounds that humans make.  There was also a great deal of left brain mind chatter that eventually calmed.  Feeling extremely afraid and not sure what of.  Of being alone.  Worrying a huge redwood tree would fall on me during rain and wind that northern California experiences.

If there is a mantra I’ve created to help myself get through painfully fearful times, it’s “I felt this way before and I didn’t die (or other verb) then; I’ll be just fine now.”  There have been many wee hours of the morning when sitting in the dark, I’ve thought of that mantra and even wondered if dying might not be a better alternative than the terror.

The day to day builds bedrock even when I was completely unaware of it happening.  When I ran out of hot water, I rolled the heavy propane tank over to my old liftback Toyota and drove the forty five minutes to the propane gas station in Pescader0.  The trash bags were taken to the dump there too.  When I ran out of milk for my coffee and the closest grocery store was twenty-two miles each way, I bought “instant-moo” powdered creamer as well as other canned food items. The rough wood kitchen cupboard became a decently stocked pantry.

*

*

There was a cord of wood just outside for the small stove the cabin had for heat. The 1950’s round-edged refrigerator worked fine. There was even a horse named Sarge who used to stick his head into the top part of the kitchen Dutch door as he looked for fresh carrots.

Late one night I was walking alone and suddenly felt the hair rise on the back of my neck. I sensed rather than heard something over my head. When I looked up and over to the right I saw an owl land on a utility pole.

*

Northern spotted owl

*

When there were the inevitable rains and wind, I still jumped when a branch struck the cabin roof.  I started saying that fear-mantra less often and knew what peace and quiet was.  The quiet was inside me.

So here I am twenty-five years later 3,000 miles away from that cabin. When I remember how fear felt back then and what it’s like today, it beings a smile of recognition. “I felt this way before and didn’t die (or other verb) then; I’ll be just fine now.”  Oh, what I wouldn’t give to have the chance to live in a cabin in the woods again and being so close to and with nature.

The difference is that nature is wherever I am.  It’s not a geographic thing where nature is only in my favorite places in the American west. Nature in all of its exquisiteness, power, quiet and beauty is everywhere.  I’m still planning to move though.

* * *

Redwoods on the Sequoia Trail, Big Basin Redwoods State Park

http://www.redwoodhikes.com/Big%20Basin/Sequoia.html

* * *

Leave a comment

Filed under Nature